Tag Archives: heart problem

Blood Cholesterol(Are Your Numbers Up?)

Everyone’s blood contains cholesterol. This waxy, fatlike substance is necessary for your body’s cells. You need a small amount of cholesterol to make certain hormones as well as cell membranes and other tissues. The troubles come when there is too much cholesterol in your blood, because that’s major risk for heart disease. In turn, the accumulation of plague inside the artries in the heart can lead to blocked vessels and a heart attack.

Your body gets cholesterol in two ways. Your liver makes some of it – in fact, enough to meet your body’s needs. The rest comes from animal products that you eat, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, butter, cheese and whole milk. Foods from plants do not contain cholesterol.

Remember that saturated fat raises your blood cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (the body cholesterol) more than anything else in the food you eat.

YOUR CHOLESTEROL LEVELS

If you have a high total cholesterol, you will want to know three numbers: your total cholesterol level, your LDL cholesterol level and your HDL cholesterol level. Have your doctor measure these levels regularly to make sure they are in safe range. If they are not, work with your doctor, nurse or dietian to reduce your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels and raise your HDL cholesterol levels. Check your blood cholesterol levels here:

Desirable less than 200mgldl

Borderline high risk: 200 to 239mgldl

High risk: 240mgldl or higher

If your cholesterol level is in the desirable range (less thatn 200mgldl) your risk of heart attack is relatively low unless you have other risk factors. Even so, it’s still smart to eat foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol and get plenty of physical activity. Have your cholesterol levels measured every 5 years, but if you are a man older than 45 or a woman older than 55, every 2 years.

YOUR LDL CHOLESTEROL LEVEL

The lower your LDL cholesterol, the lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. Your LDL cholesterol is an even better guage of risk than your total blood cholesterol. When you have your LDL cholesterol checked it will fall into one of these categories:

Desirable                   : less than 130mgldl

Borderline high risk     : 130 to 159mgldl

High risk                    : 160mgldl or higher.

If your LDL cholesterol is too high, your doctor will likely recommend an eating plan low in saturated fat and cholesterol, regular exercise, and weight loss if you are overweight. If these don’t lower your LDL cholesterol, your doctor can also prescribe medications to help reduce it.

YOUR HDL CHOLESTEROL LEVEL

In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50mg/dl. In the average woman, they range form 50 to 60 mg/dl. An HDL cholesterol level less than 40mg/dl puts you at a high risk for heart disease. Smoking, being overweight and having a sedentary lifestyle can all contribute to low HDL cholesterol. If you have low HDL cholesterol you can help raise it by:

Not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight.

Being physically active for 30 to 60 minutes a day 3 or 4 days a week, avoiding anobolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone), which lower HDL cholesterol levels. Estrogen and other female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels – source American heart association.

Healthy Male Checkup Package

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Improve Your Health & Avoid Heart Attack

You need to know what you are doing at a particular point. That is the reason why the following health risk awareness questionnaire was created. It is designed to give you an idea of your overall health especially your risk of heart attack or stroke. You may think you need to lose weight, stop smoking or increase your physical activity, or maybe you need to pay attention to other things. Consult your doctor if you feel you are at a risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Health Risk Awareness Test

The following factors may increase your risk of heart attack or stroke. Check all the items that apply to you. If you check two or more items on this test, you need to contact your doctors for full health assessment.

When it comes to heart attack or stroke, the following may increase your risk:

  1. AGE: Are you a man over 45 years old? Are you a woman over 55 years old or you passed menopause or had your ovaries removed and you not taking estrogen.
  2. MEDICAL HISTORY: You have coronary heart disease or you have had a heart attack. You have been told that you have cartoid artery disease or you have had a stroke of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or you have a disease of the leg arteries.
  3. FAMILY HISTORY: Your father, brother, mother or sister has had a heart attack. You have a close relative who has had a stroke.
  4. SMOKE TOBACCO AND CIGARETTE: You smoke or you live or work with people who smoke everyday.
  5. TOTAL BLOOD CHOLESTEROL AND HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN (HDL) CHOLESTEROL: Your cholesterol level is 240mg/dl or higher. Your HDL (good) cholesterol level is lower than 40mg/dl. You do not know your total cholesterol or HDL levels.
  6. BLOOD PRESSURE: Your blood pressure is 140/90mm Hg or higher or you have been told your blood pressure is too high. You do not know what your blood pressure is .
  7. EXERCISE: You don’t get a total of 30 minutes of physical exercise at least three to four days each week.
  8. OVER BODY WEIGHT: You are 20 pounds or more overweight for your height and built.
  9. DIABETES: You have diabetes or you have a fasting sugar of 126mg/dl or higher or you need medicine to control your blood sugar.

Health Risk Awareness Test Result

If you checked Age, Medical History or Family History, consult your family doctor for total checking if you have not done so in the past especially if you are 65 or older; at this age bracket 70 percent of heart attack occur. People who have a heart attack before 65yrs often have a strong family history of heart diseases or stroke. If you have had a heart attack, you are at greater risk of having another.

You need to check the following:

  1. SMOKING.

Smoking is the single greatest preventable cause of death in any country. The sooner you quit smoking the sooner you will lower your risk.

  1. BLOOD CHOLESTEROL.

Medical research shows that patients with high cholesterol of 240mg/dl or more have greater risk of heart attack than persons with cholesterol level of 200mg/dl. Get your cholesterol level checked by your doctor and if it is higher than normal, then discuss how diet, exercise, weight loss and medication can better your condition.

  1. BLOOD PRESSURE.

High blood pressure is often called the silent killer because it usually has no symptoms yet can result in heart attack or stroke. In fact, high blood pressure is the single most important risk factor for stroke. People with high blood pressure may need to change diet, lose weight, exercise, quit or reduce alcohol and also take medicine to normalize blood pressure.

  1. PHYSICAL INACTIVITY.

Choose exercise you enjoy and be sure you get a total of 30 minutes of physical activity three or more days a week to get started. Physical activity will help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. It helps lower blood pressure and blood cholesterol.

  1. BODY WEIGHT.

Obesity is a risk factor that can lead to death, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, and some types of cancer. Losing 10-20 pounds can help lower high blood pressure and total blood cholesterol and help control diabetes in some people.

  1. DIABETES.

Several other factors for heart attack and stroke interact in diabetes. Obesity and physical inactivity are also risk factors of diabetes. Your blood pressure should be lower than 130/85 mm Hg. To control diabetes, you may need to change your eating habits, lose weight, increase your physical activity level and take drugs. It’s critically important to have regular checkups.

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